Matthias Klaudt and Susanna Kuhn 1799-1865

Matthias Klaudt was born in Poland. He married Susanna Kuhn who was born in 1801 also in Poland. They were married in 1820. A few years after their marriage, they immigrated to Paris, Bessarabia, Romania. They had 11 children, 7 boys and 4 girls. Gottfried born 1825, Michael born 1827, Christoph born1828, Gottlieb born 1830, Karolina born 1833 (She died before she was 10), Christina born 1835 (She died when she was just 5 days old), Samuel born 1836, Christian born 1838, Susanna born 1840, Karolina born 1842 and Daniel born 1846.

There were 141 families that settled in Paris. They had been told that they would receive some travel money, and a place to stay as well as free land if they would farm it. They received only a small amount of money and when they reached Paris, they found nothing but a little lumber that had weathered badly. Most of them were very poor after the long journey. Since they found no houses there, they had to do the best they could. They built tent-like huts and covered them with grass and reeds. They lived there until fall. By winter, some had built small houses of clay, others had mud huts. I took a long time but slowly decent houses began to be seen, then sheds and barns.

As each family established a homestead they were given a few things to help them get established. The government gave them 10 rubles (Russian money), a wagon, a plow, a shovel and a hoe as well as a few other tools such as a scythe, a sickle, an ax a hammer and so on. The soil was very hard making farming very difficult. They had to have 6 or 8 oxen yoked together to do the work. They received only two oxen and a cow per farmstead so they had to share and work together to do the work. Once the soil was worked however, few families had enough money to buy seed. As it turned out, the soil had quite a bit of alkali in it which makes it poor for growing grain.

In 1831, cholera was brought to Russia. I reached Bessarabia. This brought it to the colony of Paris. In Paris it claimed the lives of 49 individuals.

In the fall of 1825, just before midnight, there was an earthquake strong enough to wake everybody up. They all ran outside to see what was happening. Only five years later, they had another one though it was less noticeable. A third one occurred eight years after that in 1838. It was bigger than the previous two. Because of the strong tremors of the earth, people walking looked like staggering drunks.

Paris was not a place where very many people prospered. They experienced many setbacks such as disease in their cattle, locusts and drought which made harvests small. They often did not even have enough to make their own bread which they would have to buy, but they never gave up, and with each challenge they faced, the kept on trying.

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Diane Klaudt Kirstine
    Aug 11, 2009 @ 21:14:09

    I happened to be surfing through Google today and came upon this wonderful history of my descendants Matthias and Susanna Kuhn, through their son, Christian. This is a piece of family history I did not have. Thank you very much.

    Reply

  2. crstamping
    Aug 11, 2009 @ 23:31:18

    You are very welcome. I wrote that history about 5 years ago after researching as much as I could find out about the family and the place that they lived. I’m glad you found it interesting.

    Reply

  3. KEVIN ROSS
    Jun 01, 2012 @ 16:45:16

    DANIEL WAS MY GREAT GREAT GRAND FATHER THEN HIS SON GOTTLIEB THEN DANIEL AGAIN THEN RUBY KLAUDT… MY MOTHER. GOTTLIEB MARRIED KATHERINA BECKER AND MIGRATED TO AMERICA,,, NORTH DAKOTA 1870

    Reply

  4. KEVIN ROSS
    Jun 01, 2012 @ 16:48:06

    YOU CAN FIND A LOT ON KLAUDT INDIAN FAMILY HISTORY WEBSITE REINHOLD KLAUDT

    Reply

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