Life Story of August Lenz

August LenzMy Life Story

By August Lenz

August Lenz:  born January 29, 1894, in Murg, near Sackingen, Baden, Germany, but recorded in Pfeffers, Ct. St. Gallen, Switzerland.

Fathers name:  Jacob Anton Lenz

Mothers name: Anna Katharina Muchenberger

My father, Jacob Anton Lenz was born and raised in the small mountain hamlet of Vatis, in the district of Pfeffers, in the canton of Saint Gall, Switzerland.  His trade was the then famous Swiss embroidery, which at that time was used all over the world and his work later took him to a small town on the River Rhein, just across the river from Switzerland, but on the Germany side.  There the family lived for four years.  And there is where I was born on the twenty-ninth day of January 1894.

The town is Murg, in Baden, Germany.  But the vital statistics in those European countries were recorded in the municipal offices and if a family moved away, no matter how long, all the births, deaths, and marriages were still recorded in that same office where the first of all the Lenzes lived.  Consequently, all the records of our family are still in Pfeffers, and no record of my birth could be found in Baden.

In my fourth year we moved back to Switzerland to Over Ottikon in the Canton of Zurich, and there I spent my early boyhood.

My parents were Latter Day Saints and like all other Saints out in the world, they longed to go to Zion.  About the time I was ten years old, Father and Joseph, my older brother, immigrated to Quebec, but they did not like it there very much.  They moved on to Montreal.  In six months they had saved enough money to send for my oldest brother, Jacob, and in another half year, the three of them together had earned enough to send for the rest of the family.

There were in the family now, beside Father and Mother, six children – Jacob, Joseph, August, Anna, Frieda, and Henry.

We soon moved to Chicago, and in my thirteenth year Jacob, Joseph, and I went homesteading in central Saskatchewan, which was then very sparsely settled.  Jacob and Joseph both took up land and after we had been there a year, Father brought the rest of the family from Chicago.  He also took up a homestead.  So Joseph and I both went to work to provide a living for the rest while they worked to improve the land.

I was about seventeen years old when I went out to the mountains to work on the railroad that was then being built from Edmonton to Victoria on the coast.  The next spring I moved to Cardston, Alberta where a tract of land that had been under grazing lease for many years was being opened up for homesteading.  I was there baptized into the Mormon Church in the Mountain View district and was soon sent upon a mission to Germany.  There I was caught in the first Great War.

In the spring of 1915 I was released and returned to Raymond, Alberta.  There I married Martha Schellenberger in the spring of the year and in the fall of the year we went to Salt Lake City and were married in the temple.  In about 1917 we moved to Hill Spring where I rented a farm.  There Martha died and also our baby boy, Joseph Henry.

I then took over a farm in Kimball, Alberta, and because of the extreme drought that year I moved to the mountains to make hay for my stock.  I lived in the Beazer district for several years, after which I moved back to Hill Spring, where I resided ever since.

August Lenz and Della CahoonIn 1919, I married Della Cahoon and our children are:  Charlotte (who is Martha’s daughter), Melva, Helen, Myrtle, Irma, Ruth, Joyce, Ruby, Rachel, Marietta, Hazel, Joseph Henry and Ireta died in childhood.August and Della Lenz

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